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Zoom: Lessons And Uses From Its Breakout Success

by | May 20, 2020 | Apps, Strategies, Thoughts, WordPress

Zoom Video Conferencing is one of the rare success stories during the COVID 19 pandemic, when other businesses are hobbled and must rely on digital communication. This article goes over basic functions of the service, how it became so successful, how to use it safely, and ways your business can make money with it.

How To Use Zoom

This video by the YouTube channel “Every Bit Helps” is a great beginners’ lesson in using the service. Most users have some idea how it works, but there are important features one may have missed.

Why Zoom Is So Popular

This article by Drift explains that Zoom already had a solid business foundation before becoming the de facto video conferencing app during the pandemic (The 3 secrets behind Zoom’s triple-digit growth). The three factors are, a customer-first culture driving a positive user experience; making a product that can sell through word of mouth; and advertising the brand in areas with the most impact.

Customer experience is a lynchpin in business success, and Zoom continuously tracks data and collects reviews from users. This led to its adoption of the “freemium” business model. You can use Zoom for free, but for only 40 minutes at a time. If you want to hold longer meetings, you need to upgrade to one of its premium pricing tiers, based on the size of your business. Zoom’s developers strive to make the free version reliable and easy to use.

In the early days of Zoom’s business, they focused their advertising and brand awareness in the San Francisco Bay area. They ran billboards along Silicon Valley’s Route 101, and ran banner ads at Golden State Warrior games. Being a tech company, they wanted their fellow software developers to be early adopters, who could most effectively attest to the product’s quality.

Zoom Security

But is Zoom high quality? We’ve all seen the backlash against it as Zoom meetings have been intruded upon, and the app’s security questioned. Facebook’s Messenger Rooms make a point of preventing this in its press releases.

Fortunately, Zoom can be made secure with some basic precautions. The Verge lays out a plan, and notes that Zoom themselves are modifying the app to make security easier (again with user feedback!) The first factor in Zoom meeting security is creating meeting passwords, and sharing them only with the people you invite. The Verge article lays out the steps:

From the main Zoom page, click on “My Account” in the upper-right corner, and then click “Schedule a meeting”

If you wish, you can enter a meeting topic and description. Put in the date, time, and duration of your meeting. (If you’re on the free plan, you’ve got 40 minutes.)

Look for “Meeting ID,” and select “Generate Automatically.” This will generate a unique ID for that meeting rather than use your usual meeting ID.

Make sure “Require a password” is checked. Zoom will generate a random password, but you can also create your own.

Below that, make sure “Enable waiting room” is checked (and it’s a good idea not to check “Enable join before host” since that would let participants wander into the meeting before you do).

Click on “Save”

You’ll be brought to the meetings page where you will see all of the options for that meeting. Halfway down, you can click “Copy the invitation” to put all of the info into your buffer so you can send it to your participants. When you’re ready, click on the blue “Start this Meeting” button.

If you’re using the Zoom app:

Click on “Schedule”

You will be offered essentially the same selections as in the web app. If you want to make sure the waiting room is enabled, click on “Advanced Options” at the bottom of the page.

Click on the blue “Schedule” button

You’ll be offered the chance to put the meeting into your calendar. After that, you’ll be brought back to the main window. The scheduled meeting will be on the right; if you want, you can click on the three dots to the right of your name to make changes or copy the invitation into buffer to send to your participants.

Another helpful feature is the Zoom’s virtual waiting room. You can require guests to wait to enter the meeting while you verify they were actually invited. Also, if you know that all the invited meeting participants have joined, you can “lock down” and prevent anyone else from joining.

How To Make Money With Zoom

How can you use Zoom in your business, besides running team meetings? How can a solopreneur use it to make money? Here are some ideas that combine Zoom with other tech solutions. Most of these methods can be used by hosting meetings on your business website. There is a WordPress plugin that lets you embed Zoom meetings on your web pages (Zoom WordPress plugin: https://wordpress.org/plugins/video-conferencing-with-zoom-api/)

Coaching/Consulting: An obvious use for video conferencing in business is holding coaching appointments with clients. You can send your client a link to the Zoom meeting, have your session, then invoice them later.

Sell tickets: You can host live video events on your website, and sell tickets to it with a WordPress plugin or Eventbrite. The Events Calendar WordPress plugin has a paid extension that enables you to sell online tickets, and announce them on your site’s calendar. This is useful for entertainment or fitness classes.

Paid membership: You can install a membership plugin on your WordPress site, such as MemberPress or Paid Memberships Pro, and host Zoom meetings among your site’s paid subscribers. This is useful if you run a blog with free content, and want to offer premium perks. Membership plugins work by blocking off certain pages to everyone except subscribers, and hosting your exclusive content on those pages. You can record your Zoom meetings, and keep them in an archive behind your paywall.

Webinars: Video conferencing apps like Zoom are ideal for webinars, which can be either paid ticket events, or a marketing tool. It’s common to host a free webinar in exchange for someone’s email address, then use email marketing to promote other products or services.

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